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greyes
New Contributor

crashlog status codes meaning

Hello

 

Does anyone know where I can find a list of code status and their meaning for command "diagnose debug crashlog read"

 

When I execute that command I get:

# di debug crashlog read | grep 2016-12-08 12654: 2016-12-08 08:42:39 the killed daemon is /bin/pyfcgid: status=0x100

 

What does "0x100" mean? what are other possible code status?

 

Thank you

1 Solution
hmtay_FTNT

Hello greyes, ramunas,

 

You can use this list as a rough guide. For the most part, the common signals are similar. However, there are differences and let's not go there for now. That said, you should find the answer for most of the codes you see.

 

https://code.woboq.org/gcc/include/bits/waitstatus.h.html

 

https://people.cs.pitt.edu/~alanjawi/cs449/code/shell/UnixSignals.htm

 

[link]http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/exitcodes.html[/link]

 

If you are okay reading code, the first link will tell you how the signal and exit status are roughly used. The second link is the Unix signal sent to the daemons. The third link is the exit codes.

 

If an 8 bit status is sent, 0xAA, it can be treated as a Unix signal. E.g.

 

127: 2010-12-04 05:04:04 the killed daemon is /bin/snmpd: status=0x6

This means a SIGABRT was sent.

 

144: 2011-03-11 22:54:52 the killed daemon is /bin/hasync: status=0xf

This means a SIGTERM was sent.

 

If a 16 bit status is sent, 0xBBBB, it can be treated as an Exit signal. In your example, 0x100 equals Exit(1). The implementation for the different exit values are custom and unfortunately I cant tell you what they all do specifically. 

 

HoMing 

 

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3 REPLIES 3
ramunas
New Contributor II

Hi,

somwhere I have seen that in a crash log status 0 means "normal shutdown", but it would be fine to find a whole list...

BR

hmtay_FTNT

Hello greyes, ramunas,

 

You can use this list as a rough guide. For the most part, the common signals are similar. However, there are differences and let's not go there for now. That said, you should find the answer for most of the codes you see.

 

https://code.woboq.org/gcc/include/bits/waitstatus.h.html

 

https://people.cs.pitt.edu/~alanjawi/cs449/code/shell/UnixSignals.htm

 

[link]http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/exitcodes.html[/link]

 

If you are okay reading code, the first link will tell you how the signal and exit status are roughly used. The second link is the Unix signal sent to the daemons. The third link is the exit codes.

 

If an 8 bit status is sent, 0xAA, it can be treated as a Unix signal. E.g.

 

127: 2010-12-04 05:04:04 the killed daemon is /bin/snmpd: status=0x6

This means a SIGABRT was sent.

 

144: 2011-03-11 22:54:52 the killed daemon is /bin/hasync: status=0xf

This means a SIGTERM was sent.

 

If a 16 bit status is sent, 0xBBBB, it can be treated as an Exit signal. In your example, 0x100 equals Exit(1). The implementation for the different exit values are custom and unfortunately I cant tell you what they all do specifically. 

 

HoMing 

 

ramunas
New Contributor II

Thank you very much, HoMing! 

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